Lightning Talk: Open Learning Experience Bingo

Opening slide for a lightning talk on Open Learning Experience Bingo given by Nate Angell on 11 Dec 2020, with vintage bingo number balls in the background.

On Friday, 11 December 2020, I gave a lightning talk organized by Creative Commons about the ongoing collaborative project for a bingo “game” to surface and discuss the many different ways that educational experiences can “open” beyond traditional practices. You can access the presentation for my lightning talk, which references back to many resources here … Read more

Open Learning Bingo: Zines as Open Pedagogy

A 4x4 bingo card with highlights on various dimensions of openness in various learning experience ingredient squares. Materials: connect, create, include, share, surface; Activities: connect, include; Skills: include; Tools: include; People: connect, include; Roles: connect, surface; Places: blank; Times: blank; Goals: blank; Feedback: blank; Evaluation: create, include; Recognition: share; Design: share

In my first series of experiments applying open learning experience bingo to descriptions of actual learning experiences, I’ve started with experiences cataloged in the Open Pedagogy Notebook. This second bingo card is for the open learning assignment “Zines as Open Pedagogy” by Elvis Bakaitis. You can browse all the open learning bingo games I’ve collected to date.

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Open Learning Bingo: What Open Education Taught Me

A 4x4 bingo card with highlights on various dimensions of openness in various learning experience ingredient squares. Materials: connect, reflect; Activities: reflect; Skills: connect, develop, reflect; Tools: blank; People: connect, include, reflect; Roles: connect, reflect, surface; Places: blank; Times: reflect; Goals: blank; Feedback: connect, reflect; Evaluation: connect, reflect; Recognition: connect, reflect; Design: reflect, surface.

For my first series of experiments applying open learning experience bingo to descriptions of actual learning experiences, I’ve started with experiences cataloged in the Open Pedagogy Notebook. Because student work is super valuable, I decided to start with the entry there from Jamie Marsh that was identified as a student perspective.

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OKP Learning Experience Bingo 2.0

Screenshot of a bingo card for open learning experience design side-by-side with a simplified version of it, accessible at: http://xolotl.org/okp-learning-experience-bingo-2-0/

This bingo card (image, Google Slides) is designed to offer a way for people to consider how learning experiences — like activities, assignments, modules, or courses — might be “opened” in various ways. For example, a learning experience might be opened by enabling wider access to more people, more agency for people involved, or more possibilities in its materials, tools, goals, outcomes, and/or design.

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OKP Learning Experience Bingo 1.0

Screenshot of a bingo card for open learning experience design, accessible at: http://xolotl.org/okp-learning-experience-bingo-1-0/

After getting a lot of really helpful feedback on the Open Knowledge Practices Learning Experience Rubric 1.1 (OKPLER 1.1), I’ve tried to transform it into a resource that incorporates the fantastic contributions from other folks and still provides a tool we might use to think about the “openness” of learning experiences. The biggest change is from the format of a rubric to more of a mapping tool, that I’ve been thinking of as a sort of “bingo card”.

TL;DR: The new bingo card for open learning experiences is quite a bit different than the rubric, both simpler and, underneath, more complex. Read on to learn more.

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OKP Learning Experience Rubric 1.1

Screenshot of a rubric for open learning experience design, accessible at: http://xolotl.org/okp-learning-experience-rubric/

As a part of the work I’ve been doing around opening knowledge practices generally, I’ve been thinking about how one might design open learning experiences that support multiple meanings of “open”: not just using open educational resources (OER), not just enabling open educational pedagogies (OEP), and not just offering wide access (like MOOCs), but all those meanings of open and more. To continue what is a long-standing conversation across the open community, I’ve tried to distill characteristics and levels of open into a rubric that one might use as a guide to designing and/or evaluating open learning experiences.

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